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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  November 6, 2011 6:00am-7:30am EST

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their pain. >> i'm so happy. thank you. >> i want them to feel the compassion that we're trying to share with them, to wrap our arms around them and say, come on, i have a little extra strength i want to share with you, let's get you back on your feet. good sunday morning, everybody. i'm t.j. holmes. a second earthquake in 24 hours in oklahoma. and this one, the largest on record for that state. plus this morning, republican herman cain clashes with reporters again. >> mr. cain, an attorney for one of the women who filed the sexual harassment complaint -- >> don't even go there. >> can i ask my question? >> no, because i -- >> can i ask a good question? >> where is my chief of staff? >> right here.
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>> please send him the journalistic code of ethics. >> yes, cain giving lessons in ethics. says he's not talking about sexual harassment claims against him. reporters have not stopped asking. also, more arrests and violence at several occupy protests around the country. this is your cnn sunday morning. thank you for spending part of your weekend here with us. and a special hello as always to our military men and women watching us right now on the american forces network. thank you for being here, and thank you for what you do. let's start with the ground rumbling in central oklahoma once again. people there a bit unsettled after two earthquakes and a string of aftershocks. got some video here coming in from broken bow, oklahoma. the u.s. geological survey said the magnitude 5.6 earthquake, the largest ever to hit oklahoma, struck just before midnight eastern time. there are reports of damaged homes and buildings, what you're
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seeing on the video. a highway buckled as well in places. a report that only one person has been injured. listen to some of the homeowners describe what was going on last night. >> this is the after effects of what happened tonight. we -- we're just getting ready to go to bed after watching those two football games. and this was a little bit more exciting. all of a sudden it sounded like -- almost like a freight train coming through, and there was a lot of wind, there was -- it sounded like wind, and then everything started shaking real bad in the house. i know that we've had different, smaller earthquakes in oklahoma, and i've never really -- i slightly felt them, but nothing like this. >> ran down to see it, and i could not believe how much damage there was from it. i'm surprised there's not more to be honest as long as it shook. it was at least a minute. the upstairs -- literally, my kids, trophies, the piano upstairs, everything was -- the little tassles on the fans, they
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had at least a minute. >> i'm here with reynolds now. we were just talking about earthquakes, we don't hear about them that often in this area. what's going on? two in 24 hours. now we're told this is the largest ever on record for the state. >> absolutely because the largest ever, we spoke about it less than 24 hours ago, the 5.5 that struck in 1952, april 9. the one that caused the crack in the capitol. 45 feet inlected. there is a fault line that runs through parts of oklahoma, and along it there -- there's been aftershocks. you've seen the damage. what we had yesterday was interesting. had it been something smaller, not a 5.6 but perhaps a, say, 4.1, that would have been considered an aftershock. because it's higher, more intense on the richter scale than the one we had yesterday, this is its own separate earthquake. and i can tell you although you see the pictures throughout parts of oklahoma, the effects of this were felt near and far.
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in fact, last night on facebook, i can tell you from personal experience, some good friends of mine actually were in parts of wichita. they were talking about feeling the earth moving, hearing the windows rattle. and you see the video here in oklahoma. you've got damage to roadways. you see where the ground is splitting. stucktural damage. not unusual when you have a 5.6. this is not as strong as the earthquake we had last weekend in turkey. in fact, just exactly a week ago we had the strong one in turkey. not as strong as the 9.0 that we that struck japan. to say the least, a very impressive earthquake. there may be some aftershocks that will follow. in fact, i would anticipate that there will be -- not a guess, but it's all but a certainty that we'll have aftershocks through the morning and perhaps over the next several days. >> okay. should we make anything of this? that we had two in the past 24 hours? does this happen oftentimes that you get a lot of activity at one time? >> it seems you often have a pattern so to speak.
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we'll have a little seismic activity. basically you have the fault line, two different areas of the earth's surface brushing up against each other. friction builds up and to release the friction you have the earthquake. so not unusual at all. it might be -- what's interesting is you might have another one within the hour. you might have one next month or five years from now. that is going to be a place where you'll see activity. what's interesting, too, is when you think about the span of geologic time, although it might not fit into our lifetimes, having one say, ten years, 20 years from now, that's close proximity. the earth is 4.6 billion years old. having something that quick and that soon even years apart is actually in terms of geologic time very, very close together. there's a -- pretty good frequency. here we might see aftershocks, perhaps even more damage because some of these buildings, as you hear, already damaged a bit. another shake or two. maybe even a 5.5 which would be considered an aftershock could cause more damage. >> all right. and to our viewers, we do have some video we're going to share
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later. local report there. they were live on the air, news anchor there in town and the shaking started. he was live on the air. we'll be sharing that later. reynolds, of course, will have the forecast and be with us throughout the morning. thanks for right now, buddy. >> you bet. at six minutes past the hour, the republican debate that didn't necessarily live up to the billing. newt gingrich and herman cain were supposed to be facing off one on one in texas. supposed to be a lively debate in the style of those legendary lincoln douglas debates. instead this turned into two guys complimenting each other's ideas and then, of course, bashing president obama. at one point, gingrich likened president obama to bernie madoff. now herman cain, well, he wasn't too feisty during the debate. he saved that for after the debate. the rule was that no one could ask about those sexual harassment claims during that o one-on-one debate so the questions came in the post-game. didn't sit well with herman cain. listen to this clash with
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reporters afterwards. >> if you all listen, then y'all just listen for 30 seconds, i will explain this one time. >> could you sit down for us -- >> okay -- >> why not -- >> it's time for us to trade places, everybody, so mr. cain, it's time to trade places. >> you all, i was going to do something that my staff told me not to do and try to respond, okay? what i'm saying is this -- we are -- >> sir -- >> we are getting back on message -- >> thank you, mr. cain. >> end of story. back on message. read all of the other accounts. read all of the other accounts where everything has been answered in a story. we're getting back on message, okay? >> want to get back on message but still those claims of sexual harassment don't seem to be going away, and reporters as you see continue to want to ask about. we'll have more on cain's campaign a little later in the show. also, the field of republican presidential candidates will square off in
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some other debates this week. we'll have more on that should mitt romney's iowa push in the week ahead. >> reporter: good morning, t.j. mitt romney returns to iowa tomorrow. the republican presidential candidate hasn't spent a heck of a lot of time stumping in the state that kicks off the primary and caucus calendar. regardless the most recent polls indicate the former massachusetts governor is tied with businessman crane for the lead in the hawk -- herman cain for the lead in the hawkeye state. romney went big in iowa four years ago in his bid for the white house, and the strategy backfired. the question this time around is whether romney will go big again. >> i will be here again and again campaigning here. i want to get the support of the good people of iowa. i'd love to win in iowa. >> reporter: wednesday, the candidates team off in a debate for the first time since our showdown in las vegas. the cnbc debate in michigan will focus on the economy. the candidates share the stage saturday in south carolina for a debate that focuses on foreign policy and national security.
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t.j.? >> thanks to our paul steinheiser, as always. at nine minutes past the hour, we turn to a shocking and disturbing story out of pennsylvania that focuses attention on penn state university's football program. it involves former assistant coach jerry sandusky. you might not know that name, but he was an assistant for legendary head coach joe paterno for 30 years. sandusky also ran an organization for less fortunate kids called second mile. sandusky has now been arrested and charged with sexually abusing eight kids, all of them young boys. prosecutors say it went on for 15 years, between 1994 and 2009. here's what the attorney general is now saying about the case, "this is a case about a sexual predator who used his position within the university and community to repeatedly prey on young boys." now the details in the indictment are extremely
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disturbing. sandusky is saying he's innocent. listen to his attorney. >> he's been aware of these allegations now for over three years. he came pack back to state coll voluntarily. on the other hand i've seen accounts and allegations where there are allegations of child that involved hundreds of counts. 40 in term of perspective, in terms of the nature of the case and allegations, it doesn't surprise me. >> that's for penn state, the coach. joe paterno brought the abuse allegations to the attention of the university in 2002, three years after sandusky quit as coach. he still had access to the school, often brought kids there. two officials at the university are also facing charges for allegedly lying about what they knew. the university president is standing by those two employees right now saying the allegations about a former coach are troubling, and it's appropriate
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that they be investigated thoroughly. protecting children requires the utmost vigilance. but about the two current employees, he says "i am confident the record will show that these charges are groundless, and that they conducted themselves professionally and appropriately." the indictment is the result of a three-year investigation. the 67-year-old sandusky is now out on bail. let's turn to the occupy movement. we saw more arrests last night in the occupy atlanta protest. the protesters moved out of woodruff park at closing time but moved down the street. several people were arrested when a motorcycle cop was knocked over. tempers flared in washington when three occupy protesters were hit by a car. police let the driver of the car leave the scene which led to confrontations between protesters and police. the three people who were hit got tickets for crossing against the light. in new york, around 20 protester were arres were arres
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clogging up sidewalks in the financial district. protesters said the walk was to support the move your money day effort targeting big banks. there are still about 110,000 customers without power in connecticut, no light or heat. it's cold. the power company is promising to have the lights on for 99% of the people by tonight. they gave themselves that deadline. the governor says he does not think connecticut light and power company is going to be able to get it down. power lines were knocked down by a big snowstorm more than a week ago. so you heard us talking about it yesterday. everybody was talking about it. called it the game of the century. tickets were going for $6,000 on line. yes, folks, worth every penny. it wasn't a high-scoring affair. number one lsu beat second ranked alabama last night in overtime the score -- 9-6. lot of good defense, but still
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made for a great game. they pounded each other the whole game. if you wanted some offense, you should have checked out the razorbacks as they beat up on south carolina. that's another story. the commander in chief's trophy going to be staying north of colorado springs. the air force academy falcons rallied for -- from a 14-0 deficit at halftime to beat the black knights of army. they answered, 24 points in the second half. 24-14 the final. coming up, 13 minutes past the hour. news about legendary boxer joe frazier. the news is not good about his health. he is facing a battle against cancer and really the word coming out from his camp and family, not good right now. quick break. over p.f. chang's home menu orange chicken women men and uh pandas... elbows mmm [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry, try it yourself.
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♪ everybody let's rock you know that song. you know it well. that's elvis presley. a little "jailhouse rock."
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we should be showing a live picture of memphis. we don't have that so we'll give you atlanta. good morning, atlanta. the song you're hearing is one of "time" magazine's all-time 100 songs list. critics put together the list a short time ago. the best song since 1923, the year that the magazine started, was elvis presley. a number of songs on that list. good morning again at a quarter past the hour, reynolds wolf. the folks in connecticut, they promised they'd get all the lights on. what, 99% of the folks would have their lights by tonight. >> that's right. yeah. and i assume some might be listening to us by satellite radio. to those listening, i know you're frustrated. i know especially those that are -- senior citizens, also with small kids, very tough to deal with. thankfully, the weather will be mild in the northeast. good stuff. not so much toward the west. we'll talk about that in a few minutes. let's show you the next big weather system that we're seeing in terms of winter weather.
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we've got to go way west coain sierra-neva sierra-nevada. snowfall popping up. there's more to come. you've got a lot of moisture that's coming in from the pacific ocean, and then high aloft up in the sierra-nevada. when it moves up slow into the higher elevations, it will turn into snow. we have seen light snowfall across parts of the great basin, near salt lake city. skiing friends toward snowbird will be happy campers. today, a pretty tranquil day in parts of the southern plains. pretty mild in texas. again, we talk good the snow and rain toward the west. northern plains, chance of rain. what i want you to think about and follow is what is going to happen in this part of the world. in fact, i would say right about here, in parts of oklahoma and kansas, late tonight and into tomorrow, there's going to be the chance of severe weather right in that pocket. you've got plenty of moisture that's going to be pulling into the area. a lot of unstable air masses because you've got the warm air, too. the front is going to be the
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catalyst if you will. there will be a chance of severe weather in that part of the world. very mild for you in parts of the eastern seaboard, as we mentioned. plenty of sunshine there. highs wrapping it up in boston, 56. new york, 56. 70 in memphis. 74 in new orleans, 47 in denver. 67 in el paso. atlanta, the high of 67 degrees. t.j., that's the forecast. we'll pitch it back to you. and i know we're probably going to be talking about something else, having to do with boxing? >> you hate this, joe frazier -- legendary boxer. people know him from the classic bouts with muhammad ali. news now that he has liver cancer, discovered a few weeks ago. he's 67 years old. he's now in hospice care in philadelphia. the word coming out of his camp, many family members and people speaking who are close to the situation, say it's -- not a good situation right now. doesn't look that good. still, he is not doing well.
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frazier, the thrilla in manila. they don't make them like that. you can't name a single heavyweight now, can you? >> i really can't. many have said that if it weren't for ali, if it had not been at the same time, that frazier would have been the boxer of the generation. two people, active in the community in philadelphia. sad to see this happen. what a wonderful guy, good american. taylor oweerrell owens, abo 38 in december. coming back from a serious knee injury. wants to show that, hey, i can play. apparently he needs a job pretty badly. an arrest warrant has been issued for terrell owens because he missed a court date, a court date connected to a child support hearing. again, he is an unemployed wide receiver right now, says that the child support payments are
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based on income he had several years ago, at the height of his career, making a lot of money. right now he's not making that money. trying to get back into the league, on the team. held an open workout. no teams showed up. that was a week or so ago. >> not a good sign. >> that's not a good sign. still, standing by for the phone call. turning to the nba, this ain't happening. it doesn't look good for the lockout to end. owners are giving the players until wednesday to accept a deal. to accept the latest proposal. the players union saying they're not even going to put it up for a vote. clearly they don't plan on accepting that. but the league has already canceled games through the end of this month. players don't take this latest deal by wednesday, the owners plan to pull the offer and propose another one that would give the players less money. >> you know, it seemed during the -- there was that possibility, that phantom of the nfl strike. there was at least a few rays of sunshine. we could see the parties working together. and this, you don't see
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anything. you don't see anyone taking a step forward. it's frightening to watch. >> we've got college football, pro football, college basketball, as well. we might be okay. reynolds, thank you. we'll see reynolds plenty throughout this morning. i want you to take a look at something. on a restaurant wall, can you make out what that is? yeah, that's someone being lynched. it's been up, though, for 30 years. but now someone is finally saying, hey, it needs to come down. why did it take 30 years for someone to get upset about this? we'll explain.
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22 minutes past the hour now. and a faked picture of a lynching is gaining a lot of attention in katy, texas, today. on the back wall of a restaurant there. the owner says it's no big deal. you look at it. do you think it is? it shows men with rifles, and what's supposed to be an iranian hanging from the tree. but the caption at the bottom, did you see what that says? it says, "it's time to play cowboys and iranians." some are calling it offensive. >> looking at it now, i see
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really nothing more than a display of racism and bigotry. i don't think something like this should really be accepted by any community. if this was any other race, if we were looking at a picture of an african-american or asian american or native american even, this would be a very huge deal. >> the owner, though, is standing by the sign and says it needs some context. says it was made by some locals during the 1979 iran hostage crisis and has been on the wall for 30 years now. >> i laughed. i'm still laughing. i mean, they don't understand what it is. they don't care to understand it. somebody's taken it will themselves to lead a crusade. it's my choice to have it up. it's your choice to go where you want to go. i'm not going to take it down. >> the owner says he's never had any complaints before now. what do you think? is pa pictuthat picture offensi?
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i want to hear from you, you know where to find me, @tjholmes on twitter. i'm looking forward to getting your responses on this. should that picture come down? at 24 minutes past the hour now, picture ids, intimidation, controversy over voting laws. we'll talk about that in a moment. and when does life begin? that issue on the ballot in one state this week. [ mom ] scooter? your father loves
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as we get close to the bottom of the hour on this cnn monday morning, we have key votes that could have a ripple effect across the country. voters in ohio will decide
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whether to uphold a controversial labor law that severe ly limits government workers' rights. it prohibit public employees from holding strikes. in mississippi, voters will be choosing their next governor on tuesday. could make history if they select democrat johnny dupree. that's hattiesburg three-term mayor. he could be the first black candidate to win office since reconstruction. >> i have a 100% chance of not winning if i wasn't in the race. >> if he does, it will be like moses rolling back the red sea. >> okay. he faces off against republican bryant. voters will cast ballots on a controversial measure that could have a nationwide ripple effect, as well. initiative 26, better known as "the person hood amendment." critics say if it passes it would make it nearly impossible
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for a woman to get an abortion. current mississippi governor hale barbour voted on absentee ballot on thursday. >> i voted for it. i struggled with it. i had some concerns about it, have some concerns about it. but i think all in all, i believe life can -- i know i believe life begins at conception. so i think the right thing to do is to vote for it which is what i did. also, a voter i.d. law will be on the ballots in mississippi. voters will decide on an initiative that requires a government-issued photo i.d. to vote. strict voter i.d. laws are causing controversy all over the country. critics say it's an effort to keep minorities from voting. i talked with folks who feel strongly on both sides this one. >> this is actually the most wide-scale rollback of voting rights that we have seen in this country.
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they're requiring one type of i.d. in fact, there's an estimated 21 million american that don't have state-issued photo i.d. what's wrong with the utility bill? what's wrong with your work i.d.? there are many other kinds of i.d. >> georgia has had a photo i.d. law, one of the strictest in the country, in place now for five years. they've had two federal elections and local elections. there has been no downturn in the turnout of african-american voters in any of those elections. in fact, they have gone up significantly. >> 14 states have enacted voter i.d. laws. most set to go into effect in 2012. many americans are fed up, that's reflected in the occupy movement, especially fed up with the big banks. we'll explore the "move your money" movement that's gaining traction across the country, as well. also, check this out. >> mr. cain, the attorney for one of the women who filed the sexual harassment complaints -- >> don't even go there. >> herman cain once again sparring with reporters who keep
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morning. thank you for being with us. spending part of your weekend. i'm t.j. holmes. did you move your money yesterday? apparently a lot of people did. all part of a backlash again the big banks. [ cheers ] america! >> that was just one of thousands of fed-up americans across this country who have closed their bank accounts. two similar movements declared saturday. bank transfer day or move your money day. either way, it was pretty much the same thing. where did that money go? well, it's -- assumed a lot of it went to smaller community bank and credit unions. many people say they're sick of costly multiplying bank fees. let's dig into this now with bill cheney in washington. he's the president and ceo of the credit union national association. sir, thank you for being here. is there any way for you all to gauge, to measure just how big of a day yesterday was? it was the move your money day. could you tell?
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did people move their money? >> well, yeah, we think they did. thanks for having me on. people were busy yesterday. so we don't have a lot of information directly from credit unions from yesterday. but we were talking to them throughout the week. and we actually based on our surveys of over 5,000 credit unions, best we can tell -- and this is actually through thursday of last week, not through yesterday. but over 650,000 people have moved their money. $4.5 billion, probably more than that. the something thing about that, t.j., is that's a year's worth of growth for credit unions in one month. there's definitely a movement going on. >> did you send a thank you card to bank of america? >> we haven't done that yet, no. you know what, the credit union unions,they deserve the attention they're getting. they're a better deal. it's a place where you can -- you know -- if you're a member of a credit union, you're an owner. credit unions are financial cooperatives. it's different than doing
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business with a for profit bank. there's nothing wrong with the for profit banking system. we need a strong system. but at a credit union, you're a member, an owner. it's fundamentally different than the relationship you have with a bank. >> so why -- you know what, i shouldn't get on to you for not doing a good enough job, but it -- it took people to get upset with bank of america to come to the credit unions. i guess is it difficult to put your message up and against a bank of america which of course has advertising all over the place? is that the issue? why don't people know enough about you? >> well, that's a great question. we ask ourselves that all the time. credit unions are focused on their members, focused on their communities. they don't have multimillion dollar ad budgets. while you see bank of america commercial and similar big banks all the time, credit unions are focused on serving their members. we've worked to try and get the message out. this has certainly been helpful to us. there's a lot of things people don't understand about credit unions. you know, people think that,
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well, i'm not eligible to join the credit unions just for that company or that organization. credit unions is changed over the years as the financial system has modernized, credit unions have modernized. and while you do have to be -- use have to be eligible to join a credit union, we have tools that make it easier to find a credit union that you -- that you're eligible to join. >> okay. now a lot of people who may not be that familiar -- i'll let you make your sales pitch if you will, you've been talking about how it's more personal. you have more ownership. it's not a for profit bank. but people have the concern -- is it going to be difficult? i have the ease of paying my bills on line with this bank. i've got atms all over the place. it's -- you know, it's convenient. is some of that convenience taking -- taken out if you're with a credit union? >> we don't think so. first of all, if you want to find a credit union to join, there's a web site, asmarterchoice.org. they're a smarter choice, have your interests at heart. at asmarterchoice.org, you can find a credit union you're
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eligible to join. from a convenience perspective, another thing people don't understand is it's not just the credit union down the street that is going to help you. we have a network of credit unions throughout the country. we have a co-op network with atms across the country. credit unions pooling resources to help you. so they -- they are convenient, they have the sophisticated tools, the online banking systems, over 90% of credit union members through their credit union have access to online banking and bill pay and the modern conveniences you would expect. >> bill cheney, you might want to send that letter over to say thank you to bank of america and others who started this thing. and are you reaping the benefits. thanks for your time this morning. >> thank you very much, i appreciate it. >> all right. we're 38 minutes past the hour now. we'll look at some of the stories making headlines. we have new suspicions this morning on iran's nuclear program. the western diplomats have been briefed on a soon-to-be released report from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog agency.
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the report outlines more charges that the iranians are trying to build a nuclear weapon. the islamic republic has maintained their intentions are peaceful and strictly for generating electricity. in saudi arabia, an estimated two million muslim pilgrims have arrived at mt. arafat. the second day of hajj underway. some are concerned that the political uprising in several islamic countries could spark trouble during the observance. so far, no reports of any issues. also this morning ukrai, he cain versus newt gingrich. the two republican candidates squared off for a one-on-one debate in texas. the real fireworks, though, came after the debate was over. our political reporter, shannon travis, was there. >> reporter: t.j., it was a pretty tame discussion between newt gingrich and herman cain here in the houston area. it was what happened after their debate where sparks really flew. during their debate, the two men tackled entitlement reform. government spending.
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but afterwards, candidate herman cain took questions from reporters. you obviously know that he's been besieged with claims and questions, details and denials. he took questions from reporters and basically tried to drive a stake through any more questions about what happened this week, details from the accusers. take a listen at one of the reactions from candidate cain to a reporter's question. >> if you all just listen for 30 seconds, i will explain this one time. >> could you sit down at the microphone for us, sir? would you, please? >> no, no -- >> it's time for us to trade places, everybody. so mr. cain -- it's time for us to trade places. >> mr. cain -- >> i was going do something that my staff told me ton do and try to respond, okay? what i'm saying is this -- >> could you -- >> we are getting back on message, end of story. >> thank you, mr. cain. >> back on message. read all of the other accounts.
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read all of the other accounts where everything has been answered in a story. we're getting back on message. >> but cain didn't stop there. he took another question from a reporter and essentially tried to school the simple press in the room about how to do their jobs. >> ladies and gentlemen, last question, please. >> mr. cain, an attorney for one of the women who filed a sexual harassment complaint against you -- >> don't even go there. >> can i ask my question? >> no. because -- >> no -- >> can i ask a good question? >> where is my chief of staff? >> i'm right here. >> please send him the journalistic code of ethics. >> will do. >> reporter: a journalistic code of ethics. cain saying that journalists reporting on this story are not doing their jobs properly. something that he echoed in the debate itself where at the end of the debate, he said that one of the most surprising things he's learned since running for president is that journalists are making up things out hole
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cloth. >> thanks. the code of ethics, we keep one around here somewhere, don't we, at cnn? this is from the society for professional journalists. number one it says, test the accuracy of information from all sources and exercise care to avoid inadvertent error. number two, diligently seek out the subjects of news stories that give them the opportunity to respond to allegations of wrongdoing. also, give voice to the voiceless. be vigilant and courteous about holding those with power accountable. all right. quarter mile wide, moving 30,000 miles an hour, and it's heading toward earth. we'll tell you when you need to take cover. progresso. it fits! fantastic! [ man ] pro-gresso they fit! okay-y... okay??? i've been eating progresso and now my favorite old jeans...fit. okay is there a woman i can talk to? [ male announcer ] progresso. 40 soups 100 calories or less.
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we're a quarter off the top of the hour. earlier we were telling but a fake picture that's causing a
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stir in texas. on the wall of a restaurant there. you see the picture there. you see -- this is a fake lynching. t caption says, "time to play cowboys and iranians." this was put up some 30 years ago, according to the owner of the restaurant, put up during the iran hostage crisis. he says he has no intention of taking it down. but now some people are starting to complain. says the first time in 30 years that nibt hanybody has complain. monica wrote, "are you kidding me? of course it should come down. it's a public embarrassment and offensive." another says, "people don't like what that dude has in his diner, keep away from his place of business." another says, "if enough people boycott eating there and it affects his revenue, trust me, he will take it down." more of your comments continuing to come in.
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keep them coming. i am reading through them during the show. we'll share more throughout the morning. good morning again to reynolds wolf. it seems like every weekend or so you're telling me i need to duck because either there's a satellite falling but now you've got an steroasteroid coming tow us. >> a great deal of frequency. >> there's a lot. this freaks me out for some reason. >> this is massive. an asteroid the size of a nimitz class air force carrier. about 1,300 feet in width. something massive that could come within 200,000 miles of planet earth. that would be closer than the earth is to the moon. >> okay. give me -- relatively speaking, 200,000 miles, is that a little too close for comfort when we're talking about objects flying through space? >> it's very close. keep in mind unlike things we've been discussing this past month about, say, the satellites falling to earth, that's inside the earth's atmosphere. this is not going to be inside the atmosphere. it's going to remain outside. >> are you sure? >> yes. yes, yes, yes. nasa says they are 100%
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satisfied with their studies that this is going to remain -- >> satisfied, what's that mean? >> worst case scenario. you want to talk worst case scenario? let's say if something this big were to impact, let's pick the pacific ocean -- >> okay. >> not that we have any dislike for the pacific ocean and great things that happen there. say the pacific ocean, it is believed that this could cause an earthquake that would be a 7.0-magnitude earthquake. could cause a tsunami that could extend some 60 miles out from the point of impact. they could be 70-feet high. >> i don't like -- i don't want the water scenario. give me the land scenario. >> land scenario, again, 7.0 earthquake is basically the biggest thing you'd have. >> okay, what if it hits texas? >> hits texas, this is speculative, it would go through an earthquake that would be a 7.0. you have to remember that parts of texas, you don't have areas that are -- it's not like san francisco, tokyo, not like you've got buildings that are built to withstand those kind of things. so again, you're playing a doomsday scenario. >> i watch too many movies.
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>> you were watching too many movies. it is not expected to make a really -- not going to threaten the earth, but it's going to make another pass in the future that should be a lot closer possibly within 160,000 miles. >> okay. will we be able to see this thing as it flies by? >> with a real good telescope you should see it. the second time, we'll be worm food, in 2092. >> i'm not worry good that one. >> it's their problem, the grandkids' problem. let them deal with it. >> thanks. reynolds will be back shortly, covering the weather and all things up in space. 12 minutes off the top of the hour. look at this now. they have a style all their hone. women in africa dressing up like this. some call it like victorian england. it's in our "morning passport."
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♪ i've got you under my skin ♪ i've tried so not to give in my director's telling me my mic's open and i can talk any time. enjoying that song. frank sinatra. "time" magazine's list of 100 best songs since 1923, when the magazine started up. this is a signature song of frank sinatra. we've been sharing some of these songs and will share some more. at ten until the top of the morning, good morning to nadia for our "morning passport." not too much survived over the long run, but they are holding on to this in namibia.
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>> used to be southwest africa. it was german southwest africa at some point. so what you're seeing in these magnificent pictures that you are about to see in a couple of minutes women who during the 1900s, the women is -- in the 1900s, the germans colonized southwest africa. and the women came in victorian dress. and many of the herrera women worked in the homes of the colonialists. and they dressed much more sparsely because of the weather and were forced by the people they worked for to dress in victorian dress. what happened is they adopted the style. and it's always interesting because you're seeing herrera women wearing the long dresses of the victorianans. but the headdress, there's nothing victorian about that. that's supposed to represent cattle horns because the history of the herrera is that they were a cattle-breeding people.
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>> they are holding on to this? no signs of things changing? >> no, they love the long skirts and the petty coats. but it's an interesting combination of victorian style. unanymously namibian fabric. they also make dolls in the fabric that they sell to tourists. it's a tourist attraction. interesting, don't you find, that the germans colonized this part of southwest africa or southwest africa in general. they -- colonized. it was a brutal colonization. for something brutal came something very beautiful because the clothing is very ornate and very lovely. >> we're going to wrap this up, but can you put the pictures up full for me? you were telling us that this is -- the pictures were remarkable, and you're absolutely right. these are gorgeous, and to think that women in africa are wearing these. these are pretty -- >> in the heat of africa are
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wearing these long dresses, lots of petticoats, and they'll wear them as a symbol of pride. a young woman will say to her future in-laws, look, i'm dressing this way to show you what a fantastic wife and mother i'm going to be to your future grandchildren. >> great stuff. our "morning passport" from namibia. thank you very much. we'll see you shortly. as we get close to the top of the hour, the new york city marathon is today. and some running in it will be wounded warriors who served this country on the front lines. they are taking part in the marathon. we are following their journey. stay here for that. [ male announcer ] it's true... consumers er wanchai ferry orange chicken... over p.f. chang's home menu orange chicken women men and uh pandas... elbows mmm [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry, try it yourself. when you're a sports photographer, things can get out of control pretty quickly. so i like control in the rest of my life... especially my finances. that's why i have slate, with blueprint.
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so my parents went to bank of america. they met with the branch manager and they said, "look, we've got this little hot dog cart, and it's on a really good corner. let's see if we can buy the property." and the branch manager said, "all right, i will take a chance with the two of you." and we've been loyal to bank of america for the last 71 years.
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♪ very superstitious writing on the wall ♪ ♪ very superstitious just a few minutes to the top of the hour. good morning to you, new york city. columbus circle on the right, sta stew tue of liberty on the . in new york, listening to "superstition" from stevie wonder. one of "time's" all-time 100 songs we're sharing this morning. we're a couple hours from the 43rd annual new york city marathon. starts around 9:30 eastern time. of course, big field of runners. always a fun day out there. race organizers ran out of shirts yesterday. 25 disabled veterans are taking part today.
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two of them really good buddies who lost limbs on the battlefield in iraq and afghanistan. they're telling our cnn photojournalist rod griola why competing in the marathon means so much after everything they've been through. make sure that's tight there. >> usually the first half of the marathon for me, i'm asking myself why i did this. and the second half is usually a lot better. usually the second half is best. nicholas colchar, alpha company, first armored company, engineer. i was injured in sadr city in 2008. i was found at walter reed army medical center recovering from injuries. >> we approached him and said, do you want to participate in a hand cycle, participate in this race. he said, no, ma'am, i'm all set. my name is jenna griffith. i'm the director of the achilles freedom team of wounded veterans. >> at first wasn't interested. was more interested in recovering.
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>> it takes a while, two to three weeks after injury, a month after injury, you go up and say, hey, do you want to do a marathon. they think that it's a joke. they think, are you kidding? who's the crazy person coming and talking to me. >> they pulled -- soldier hand cranks, getting them to do races and asking them to join the freedom team. my name is michael cacher. i was injured in afghanistan june 18, 2008, while i was deployed with the 28th infantry division, national guard. in my head, i'd love to, i'd love to but i can't. and they're like, why? i had a colooft me, my lungs collapsed, i can't breathe. they're like, don't worry, what's your goal? i said, my ultimate goal would be to do a marathon. >> they brought me to new york, the hopes and possibilities, did that in june of 2010. kind of caught the bug from
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there. this will be my sixth marathon, first new york city marathon. >> and it was actually my first marathon, a boston marathon. an unbelievable beginning to end experience that can never be -- well, pretty hard to beat. i won't say can't be toned, but pretty hard to top. >> good luck to those guys and all the runners today. the marathon getting underway in 2 1/2 hours. coming up, oklahoma once again did some shaking. a second earthquake in the past 24 hours. this one is the strongest on record for oklahoma. [ beep ] [ mom ] scooter? the progresso chicken noodle you made is so good. it's got tender white meat chicken. the way i always made it for you. one more thing.... those pj's you like, i bought you five new pairs. love you. did you see the hockey game last night? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. but for some of us with overactive bladder,
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we are at the top of the hour on this cnn sunday morning. good morning to you all. a second earthquake in 24 hours in oklahoma. and this one, the largest on record for the state. also this morning, republican herman cain clashing with reporters again. >> mr. cain, an attorney for one of the women who filed a sexual harassment complaint -- >> don't even go there -- >> no because -- >> can i ask a good question -- >> where is my chief of staff? please send him the journalistic
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code of ethics. >> we are working on our code of ethics in journalism these days. cain says we need to. he says he's not talking about the sexual harassment claims against him. reporters, though, have not stopped asking. also this morning, more arrests and violence at several occupy protests around the country. in a few minutes, my interview with reverend jesse jackson who says the occupy movement is much like the civil rights march on washington. he says he is seeing the results. this is your cnn sunday morning. i'm t.j. holmes. thank you very much for spending time with us. and the folks in oklahoma, they're feeling unsettled this morning. another earthquake? this is two earthquake now and a number of aftershocks. some video we can show you here from broken arrow where there are reports of damaged homes and buildings. highway 62 reportedly buckled in a couple of places. the u.s. geological survey says a magnitude 5.6 earthquake, the largest ever on record there in oklahoma, said it hit just before midnight eastern time. they were feeling it during
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their late local news. watch this play by play now from our affiliate kytv in oklahoma city live on the air when the earthquake started. >> having an earthquake. our lights shaking quite a bit. it is calming down as another earthquake has just hit. i still hear a few lights rattling in our studio. and we will -- we still have -- if you can see our duratran behind us, still shaking. here in oklahoma city. we do not know the epicenter as it just now happened. >> you know, you -- you don't report on the news after it happens, sometimes it happens while you're live. still, okay, a couple things here. >> bring it on. >> a lot of people think oklahoma, they don't think earthquakes first of all. here wee, t -- here we are. what's happening? >> the have a fault line that splits through the state of oklahoma. similar to any fault line you'll
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find anywhere in the world. say the san andreas fault, it's not as active as in san andreas or along parts of the pacific rim. but still, it certainly caused damage. you see it there on the roadways. some structural damage. there was a person injured. thankfully no fatalities. what's really mind-boggling about the whole situation is how far away this was felt. there are people in wichita, people in illinois, people in texas. they have reported feeling the shock of this earthquake. 5.6 magnitude. again, not the most destructive earthquake but something you don't have every single day in oklahoma. what's amazing is the -- actually the biggest in history that you see on the screen, april 9 of 1952 that caused a 45-foot -- actually split through part of the state capitol. that was the biggest one ever. that was a 5.5. last night's was 5.6. if we had another, a 5.5, that would be considered an aftershock because you had the just 5.6. anything that is in less frequency within relatively
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close proximity to what we just had is going to be considered an aftershock. not unusual to have these in parts of oklahoma. i'm sorry, it is -- i misspoke. it's certainly unusual to have them in this frequency. can happen because you're close to the fault line. but certainly something that's going to really rattle the windows in that part of the world. certainly a wake-up call to a lot of people. keep in mind earthquakes can happen anywhere on the planet. they can happen at the north pole, at the south pole. they can happen any spot you can think of. coming up, we'll talk about that place that was earthquaked by the earthquake and how the ground may be shaking soon due to severe weather that may pop up over parts of oklahoma, texas, and maybe even arkansas later tonight and into tomorrow. could be a very active time ai there geologically speaking. >> reynolds, thanks, we'll talk to you in a minute. at six minutes past the hour
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we'll transition to politics. and the republican presidential candidate debate said -- i don't know if this lived up to the billing really. this was supposed to be a one on one, newt gingrich versus herman cain facing off in texas. was supposed to be a lively one-on-one debate in the style of the legendary lincoln douglas debates. it turned out they sat and complimented each other's ideas but went after president obama. at one point gingrich likened president obama to bernie madoff. herman cain, the fireworks for him started after the debate. the rule was that no one could ask about the sexual harassment claims during the debate. so the questions came up in the post-game. didn't sit well with herman cain. >> if you all listen, if you all just listen for 30 seconds, i will explain this one time. >> could you sit down for the microphone for us, sir -- >> no, no. it's time for us to trade places, everybody. so mr. cain, it's time for us to trade places.
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>> you see what i mean? you all -- i was going to do something that my staff told me t not to do and try to respond. okay? what i'm saying is we are getting back on message, end of story. back on message. read all of the other accounts. read all of the other accounts where everything has been answered in a story. we're getting back on message. okay? >> maybe easier said than done. again, trying to get back on message. reporter still having those questions. we will continue to follow the cain campaign, have more on it later. also, shocking, really disturbing story to turn to out of pennsylvania now. it focuses attention on penn state university's football program. it involves in particular that man, former assistant coach jerry sandusky. you might not know the name or the face, but he was an assistant for legendary head coach joe paterno for some 30 years. sandusky also ran an organization for less fortunate kids called second mile.
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sandusky has now been arrested and charged with sexually abusing eight kids, all of them young boys. prosecutors say it went on for 15 years, between '94 and 2009. this is what the attorney general had to say about it, "this is a case about a sexual predator who used his position within the university and community to repeatedly prey on young boys." the details of the indictment are extremely disturbing. sandusky says he's innocent. listen to his attorney. >> he's been aware of these allegations now for over three years. he came back to state college voluntarily last night. the other hand, i've seen count and cases like this where there are allegations of child abuse that involved hundreds of counts. so 40 actually in terms of perspective, in terms of the nature of the case and the allegations, it doesn't surprise me. >> as for penn state, joe
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paterno, the coach, apparently brought the abuse allegations to the attention of the university in 2002. that was three years after sandusky quit as coach. sandusky still had access to the school. often brought kids there. two officials at the university are also facing charges for allegedly lying about what they knew. university president is standing by those two employees saying, "the allegations about a former coach are troubling, and it's appropriate that they be investigated thoroughly. protecting children requires the utmost vigilance." about the two current employees he says, "i am confident the record will show that these charges are groundless, and that they conducted themselves professionally and appropriately." the indictment is the result of a three-year investigation. 67-year-old sandusky is out on bail right now. at ten minutes past the hour, let's turn to the occupy movement. more arrest last night in atlanta. protests moved out of woodruff park at closing but started marching down the street. police tried to break up the
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crowd. 19 were arrested. some after they allegedly knocked over a motorcycle cop. in washington, tempers flared when three occupy protesters were hit by a car. police let the driver of the car leave the scene which led to confrontations between protesters and police. the three people who were hit actually got tickets for crossing against the light. also in new york, around 20 protesters were arrested for clogging up sidewalks. they were marching toward banks in the financial district. organizers say the march was meant to support the move your money day efforts targeting big banks. still, 110,000 people without power in connecticut. they don't have lights, no heat right now. it's cold right about now. the power company is promising to have the lights on for 99% of their customers by tonight. the governor says he does not think connecticut light and power will be able to get that done. the power lines were knocked
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down by a big snowstorm more than a week ago. some people were calling it or at least it was billed, no doubt, as the game of the century. but did lsu, alabama, one versus two, live up the hype last night? we'll let you decide. hey, everyone's eating tacos outside bill's office. [ chuckles ] you think that is some information i would have liked to know? i like tacos. you invited eric? i thought eric gave you the creeps. [ phone buzzes ] oh. [ chuckles ] yeah. hey. [ male announcer ] don't be left behind. get it faster with 4g. at&t. ♪
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♪ if i should fall from grace with god ♪ ♪ where no doctor can relieve me ♪ ♪ if i'm buried 'neath the sod ♪ but the angels won't receive me ♪
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good morning, los angeles. a little "california love" for you. it is 4:15 in the morning out there. playing a little tupac this morning. use any excuse to play it, but this time we have a reason. this song made "time" magazine's list of the 100 best songs of all time. time has been around since 1923. they went back and found the best songs since 1923. tupac, "california love." made the cut. >> dude, i mean, that's from the soundtrack of my life. as i've always said you to, a day without tupac is a day that's not worth living. seriously. i mean, that's how i roll. >> we were in college, i know i was in college when the album came out. >> seems like yesterday. >> it doesn't really. no, long time ago. good morning to reynolds once again. we've been talking earthquakes and flying objects coming toward the earth. we need to talk some weather, too. >> we do. and unfortunately we've been
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talking about -- not unfortunately we've been talking about oklahoma, but what's been happening in oklahoma in terms of the earthquakes. now something else is coming that's going to be fairly big, too, and starting to the west. it doesn't look too impressive for the time being. you see scattered showers in california, san joaquin valley, also in parts of the sierra-nevada. snow coming through. even some on just the top of mt. shasta. but what we're going to see is the storm system that's bringing that snowfall make its way off toward the east. as it does so, it's going to interact with a lot of warm air that's coming from the gulf of mexico. high humidity can be expected for much of the central and southern plains. and look at what is going to happen. we're going to see that low make its way to the east, it's going to interact with the moisture, scattered showers first. then as we make our way into monday evening, monday afternoon, monday evening, and then overnight, there's the potential that we could see a severe weather outbreak for parts of oklahoma, perhaps into portions of the midwest like chicago, iowa, the corn belt. the back half of the system. possibly snowfall for the front range of the rockies and kansas. something we have to keep a
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sharp eye on, especially later today and into tomorrow. and by tuesday morning, we could be talking the potential for damage. hope it doesn't happen. but it's our job to let people know what might be coming. it looks like severe weather potential for parts of the southern plains, maybe into the midwest. >> all right. reynolds, thank you. 17 past the hour. we were talking it this yesterday. the whole country was talking about this. one versus two, many billed it as the game of the century. and some will say it didn't live up to the billing. what do you say? >> i say it did, absolutely. >> absolutely. >> a lot of people like a lot of scoring. >> this was a smash-mouth football game. the best defenses in the country. one versus two, lsu versus alabama in tuscaloosa. and lsu goes in and wins where teams just don't go in there and win. the score, 9-6. it even went into overtime. 6-6 at the end of regulation. that's a good game. >> amazing game. what's interesting, too, is it may be sort of a passing of the soerch in ways. there are a lot of people at lsu
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that have been holding miles as a little bit -- they haven't embraced it. they had a great affinity for coach sabin. brought them to the a national title. when miles did it, he also won a title at lsu. they said he did it with sabin's players. now we're seeing again miles going in, winning a big game. lsu has not had an undefeated seen since 1958. it looks like they might be getting -- >> another chance. >> what team are they playing toward the end of the season? >> the arkansas raiser box. lsu -- razorbacks. lsu will not go undefeated. they beat south carolina, beat the mess out of them. >> the mess? >> i wanted to say something else but that's all i could go with. thank you. 19 minutes past the hour. occupy atlanta. the occupy movement across the country getting a helping hand from a number of civil rights-era icons including reverend jesse jackson. he's offering some advice. you'll hear it next. stay with us. orange chicken...nchai fery
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22 minutes past the hour now. reverend jesse jackson, minister andrew young, andrew young, heavyweight names from the civil rights movement offering support and advice to the occupy movement. this weekend i talked to reverend jackson. he told me of the parallels he sees between the occupy movement and the last campaign of dr. martin luther king jr. >> in many ways, this is a newer version of dr. king's last effort, the poor people's campaign. his mission was to occupy the mall in washington, d.c. we call it resurrection city. dr. abernathy appointed me to be the mayor of that city. we were sent there for more than a month choosing people to choose the war on poverty at home, to survive the war, or the palm in vietnam. he felt that bombs dropped in vietnam would explode in our
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cities. he felt if we kept giving more privileges to the wealthy and the -- he called it moral and spiritual bankruptcy. today we fight the same challenges. fewer and fewer have more and more. more poverty. >> that r th-- are they getting results yet? >> they're getting attention for discussing poverty for a change. secondly, we saw the banks back down off of a fee. banks have been making money off of origination of loans. they made money off of private mortgage insurance. they made money off of the excessive fees, off of foreclosures. they got bailed out of lending, not reinvestments. they've just made money over money over money. so it's become -- i might add that student loan debt is greater than credit debt because
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of the im-- credit card debt because of the impressive schemes. >> they get the attention but at some point is the occupy movementing to to ha ing tgoing results? we've seen ugly scenes, including oakland, that's getting attention and taking away from the message. >> but the common theme is economic disparity. the health gap, wealth access gap, the education gap, the income gap, that's the theme. now that incident in oakland did not really describe the movement of oakland's economic justice. and when it did happen, those who were the occupiers stood between them and that activity. unlike memphis, dr. king leading a march for collective bargaining for sanitation work, the back of the line were some throwing bricks. they would rather cover the bricks than the banks. this issue is about bank behavior. it's about removing the glass ceiling where they choose
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investing over lending. whereas we have huge bodies of foreclosed homes, churches, and communities. >> all right. we are at 25 minutes past the hour. we'll take a break on this cnn sunday morning, then i'm back with you. [ man ] i got this citi thank you card and started earning loads of points. you got a weather balloon with points? yes, i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. ♪ keep on going in this direction. take this bridge over here. there it is. [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. ♪ [ male announcer ] write your story with the citi thankyou premier card, with no point caps, and points that don't expire. get started at thankyoucard.citi.com. your new progresso rich & hearty steak burger soup. [ dad ] i love this new soup. it's his two favorite things in one... burgers and soup. did you hear him honey? burgers and soup. love you. they're cute. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
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♪ good morning. washington, d.c., lovely morning it appears to be there in washington, d.c. listening to a little led zeppelin this morning, one of "time" magazine's all-time 100 best songs. the list came out, sharing some songs with you this morning. we'll continue to do so. well, for you travelers out there, listen to this -- new concern about those body scanners at airport security checkpoints. the tsa is promising congress it will perform new safety test after new investigations showed that the x-ray scanners could increase risk of cancer. tsa uses two scanners, 264 scanners out there called millimeter scanners.

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